NDN / KKT Overview

Afghanistan also borders Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan so alternate supply routes, termed the Northern Distribution Network, exist to move supplies into Afghanistan through these countries. There are several different routes included in the Northern Distribution Network. The most commonly used route, though also one of the longest, starts at the port of Riga, Latvia on the Baltic Sea, and continues (5,169 km) by train southwards through Russia. The supplies then pass through Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan before reaching Afghanistan’s northern border at Termez.The Northern Distribution Network was established in 2009 in response to the increased risk of sending Army supplies through Pakistan. By 2011, the NDN handled about 40% of Afghanistan-bound traffic, compared to 30% through Pakistan.After the close of the Pakistan routes in 2011, this route became the primary means of moving supplies into Afghanistan. The NDN was developed to deal with the pressing need to sustain the movement of equipment and supplies during Operation Enduring Freedom. Prior to the NDN’s establishment, the only means of resupply to US and coalition Forces in Afghanistan was through Pakistan. The two NDN “Northern Line of Communication” (NLOC) routes ran through Russia to Afghanistan via Latvia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, along with a subsidiary corridor transiting Russia, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. A southern NDN “Central Line of Communication” (CLOC) bypasses Russia completely, as it runs through Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, crossing the Caspian via rail ferries to Azerbaijan and Georgia.
By February 2012, 85% of the coalition’s fuel supplies were transported by means of this route.It is also used for moving equipment out of Afghanistan as part of the NATO drawdown.In late 2011, Afghanistan opened its first major railway line linking Hairaton on the Uzbek border, with Mazar-e-Sharif.However, in conjunction with downsizing its presence in Afghanistan, U.S strategy for Central Asia has refocused on a “New Silk Road” strategy, intended to stabilize Afghanistan by putting it at the center of a network of Eurasian trade routes. This New Silk Road is not the physical transit corridors of the NDN, but more of an alliance of Central Asian states to ensure trade and partnership in the region and for the future.

CIS Logistics Services

Since its inception on NDN route, AS Logistics has been providing vital transportation and freight forwarding services to U.S. and European prime contractors and prime vendors on behalf of US TRANSCOM, DLA and GSA contracts in support of NATO / ISAF operations in Afghanistan. We continue to support the DLA sponsored regional procurement programs in Central Asia by providing logistics and import/export customs clearance services to DLA’s respective prime vendors operating in the CIS region. With final delivery points to some of Afghanistan’s most remote Forward Operating Bases (FOB’s), AS Logistics has been supporting shipments of everything for CIS origin goods.In support of the Surface Distribution and Deployment Command (SDDC) and the US Transportation Command (TRANSCOM),with everything from import and export customs clearance and documentation requirements of each CIS country along the NDN to vital forward trucking and final delivery solutions.
We are a strong, experienced and ambitious team of professionals focused in transportation of construction and supply materials to Afghanistan using Northern Distribution Network. We are the experts on NDN/KKT routes to Afghanistan and back with retrograde. We provide a full logistics and transportation services with direct control and management from the moment of loading until delivery, including terminal handling at the port; customs and transit operations and formalities; insurance; customs clearance and tax exemption in Afghanistan .Amu Darya (Oxus) River, which forms part of Afghanistan’s border with Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan, has barge traffic. The Shirkhan Bandar bridge, reconstructed with U.S. assistance, reopened in 2007 and has opened vital trade routes between Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The Hairaton to Mazar-e-Sharif railway project has also been beneficial for the logistics solutions on this route which aims to increase trade between Afghanistan and Uzbekistan, reduce transport costs, increase vehicle operation savings, and create job opportunities in the area.

Customs Borders
The following are the Customs Borders / Customs Houses from neighboring countries to Afghanistan:
Dogharun – Islam Qala – (via Iran)
Kosha – Torghundi – (via Turkmenistan)
Aqina – Andkhoy – (via Turkmenistan)
Termez – Hairatan – (via Uzbekistan)
Kunduz – Shirkhan Bandar – (via Tajikistan)
Khybar Pass – Torkham – (via Pakistan)
SulaimanKalay – Chaman – (via Pakistan)